President must remove Bureaucratic Red Tape

President must remove Bureaucratic Red Tape

13 February 2020 03:51 pm

President must remove Bureaucratic Red Tape

Attention is drawn to the article in your opinion by Sumith de Silva under the above caption published on Wednesday. This is a good eye opener to the President who may not be aware of such inconvenience caused to citizens at most government offices, and Municipal Councils where the innocent citizens are sent from  pillar to post. Before the writer migrated to Australia, he had to get Police Clearance from Police Headquarters. Despite having boards welcoming those seeking Police clearance certificates, there were no tables for the customers to write their needs. The writer immediately wrote to the OPINION page, which highlighted this, and on the next trip to the Police Headquarters it was observed that sloping tables like in libraries were made available. Thank you, Editor Island.

There is still red tape bureaucracy in abundance in many government institutions, which the President should instruct his staff to look into and resolve, as all citizens now aim for a new era. It is suggested that a complaint box be introduced at all government institutions for the layman to lodge complaints and ideas for a contented service. The writer wishes to know whether the administration and cadre requirements at our universities are handled by the University Grants Commission or by the University Chancellors and their staff. It is reliably learnt that other than the permanent lecturers at the University of Visual and Performing Arts, there are visiting lecturers with even better qualifications who are not in the permanent cadre, but they work even harder without a pay sheet, paid only by the hours. They have the end of the calendar month to claim for the number of hours worked; the process takes time to receive their meagre payments. Some of them are bread winners of families who even travel from far away homes like in Kandy, Kurunegala and Galle. Fairness and justice need to be meted out by the President.

This is a real injustice for these lecturers who are "Visiting". It is learnt that the qualifications some possess are above those of the permanent lecturers. Some have PhDs in Ethnomusicology, First Class Honours, etc. It is time this is brought to the notice of the President as these Visiting Lecturers have not been made permanent for years, some even 10 years. The President’s intervention into this red tape bureaucracy is solicited, as this entire cluster of visiting lecturers need to be made permanent to accelerate their genuine aspirations.

SUNIL THENABADU
Brisbane